Tag Archives: hollow dependent

Estimating the density of the Greater Glider in the Strathbogie Ranges

The report documenting the findings of the 2017 Strathbogie Forest Greater Glider surveys, conducted by DELWP’s Arthur Rylah Institute, has finally been released.

ARI report front cover

Main findings:

  • The Strathbogie Forest supports a large and regionally important population of Greater Gliders.
  • The Greater Glider population in the Strathbogie Forest has not suffered the declines that have occurred in the Central Highlands and East Gippsland, reinforcing the conservation importance of the Strathbogie Forest population.
  • Government data shows that many parts of the Strathbogie Forest support Greater Glider numbers that exceed the high-density threshold that would lead to forest protection in other parts of the state.

Summary of results (in italics):

  • Greater Glider population in Strathbogie Forest is ca. 70,000 individuals.
  • The detectability of individual Greater Gliders is low, suggesting that raw spotlight counts may greatly underestimate densities.
  • The three surveyed coupes (Barjarg Flat, Mr Hat and Tartan) have a Greater Glider population of ca. 500 Greater Gliders.
  • Greater Gliders in the Strathbogie Forest occur at densities of 2 to 4/ha. [Extrapolating, nine remaining coupes (370 ha) on the TRP have a Greater Glider population of 740 to 1480 individuals.]
  • Generally, hollow-bearing trees were larger in coupes (mean DBH 118 cm), than outside coupes (mean DBH 89 cm), [suggesting that logging coupes are targeting higher conservation value areas of forest].
  • Higher numbers of Greater Gliders were found on transects with large trees, particularly trees >100 cm DBH.
  • The results of the study indicate that higher quality habitat for Greater Gliders includes areas containing a high proportion of Blue Gum and Mountain Gum and with a high proportion of trees larger than 100 cm DBH.
DSCN0708 Greater Gliderv L. Williams a

Strathbogie Forest Greater Glider (Image Lance Williams)

 

Strathbogie old growth trees – going up in flames

 One of the few 'old-growth' trees left in this forest - no more.

One of the few ‘old-growth’ trees left in this forest (DBH 1.5+ m) – no more.

Right now, there are still trees in the Strathbogie Forest that likely predate the era of British colonization in Australia. Imagine that, forest trees that were living and breathing well before Major Thomas Mitchell  pronounced Australia Felix; even before the first known map of the Port Phillip district was drawn in 1803. Trees that were standing when the Swedish navy captured one third of the Russian fleet at the naval battle of Svensksund in the Baltic Sea, in 1790! It’s a long time since the Swedes were a substantial navel power, but that’s how old these last few forest giants are (nothing against Swedes).

Sadly, if the Victorian Government keeps on burning these forests, Continue reading